Wiggly Wog

Jester House Steve

20m2

$1,000

It is amazing what you can do with the power of imagination and persistence. Working on the tight budget of $1,000, and with an unsuspecting individual who spent more time sleeping than awake, a beautiful, sustainable and cozy project was born.

This project has been standing for almost 30 years and would cost practically the same to build today as it did 30 years ago. It would also take roughly the same amount of time which was the equivalent of about 3 months full time work.

The idea for the Wiggly Wog was first captured in a painting done by Steve and from there it was simply a matter of translating it into reality.

The Wiggly Wog is primarily constructed from uncut Manuka firewood and earth. It incorporates reused windows and doors, has an earthen floor, and boasts a green roof. Perhaps one of the most captivating features of this little home is its intricate ceiling. It is made from small manuka sticks which are nailed to the top side of the manuka rafters.

So how was it possible to build a little home for $1000?

Resourcefulness and mother earth. Labour was exchanged for a place to stay and some kai and so with that out the way it was just a matter of materials. Earth. This was sourced from the property itself and formed into bricks to make the walls, poured onto the ground for the earthen floor, and layed overhead on the roof for gardens to grow. The Manuka wood and the nails and screws were the biggest costs (the screws almost broke the budget). The project is local, with the Manuka bought from just down the road and the screws/nails from a local hardware store (which helps reduce transport costs). Lastly by keeping an eye out, windows, doors, and a fireplace were able to be salvaged from other properties at no cost.

For more info or to be inspired visit www.jesterhouse.co.nz to get in contact with Steve.

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